Is Six Pack Shortcuts For Women, Too?

Is Six Pack Shortcuts For Women? And Can It Work For Women, Too?

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I think it’s obvious that Six Pack Shortcuts was created primarily for a male-dominated audience. It seems that everything about it is about getting the abs, building the gunz, and most importantly, attracting the ladies – if I may be so bold. Now, that’s not to say that Six Pack Shortcuts can’t work for women, too, as I alluded to in my complete Six Pack Shortcuts Review.

Here’s what I said…

Naturally, this program was created for guys, but it’s true that gals can also use it – and will experience much the same results if you account for gender differences. For example, women will not build nearly as much muscle as men will by using this program, but women will build strength and develop a lean, toned appearance in accordance with their body type and genetics. This is a physique-enhancement program, first and foremost, and it’ll help you create a beach-ready, and maybe even a magazine-worthy physique if you use it – regardless of gender.

Now, that’s all well and good, but you should know that some parts of the program, particularly the “dating advice” contained in some of the advanced coaching videos, will be completely useless to you. And between you and me, it’s completely useless for practically all guys as well, and the Six Pack Shortcuts staff could probably use some female perspective on this matter. Heck, practically any woman could probably put together a better impromptu dating resource for guys (if they’d only listen, right?).

So, if you can get past the fact that every aspect of this program is catered to guys, and you’re willing to use an effective program for fat loss, lean muscle gain – without waking up as a steroid-pumping pro bodybuilder the next morning – and building an attractive physique, then yes, Six Pack Shortcuts could be considered for women, too.

And let me get one thing straight. Being a fitness coach myself, while I don’t consider Six Pack Shortcuts a perfect resource for getting six pack abs from a program design standpoint, I think a lot of women would be pleasantly surprised at how positively their body responds to a little old fashioned strength training. I’ve encountered an all-too-common fear of bulking up from women whom are hesitant to start any sort of resistance training program – whether with weights or not. So, if that’s you, then please allow me to assuage your concerns. Women simply do not have the building blocks to build large muscles, and the pro bodybuilder women that you may have seen can only get that way by using large doses of very powerful drugs. It’s just not in your DNA to get that large – or anywhere near that large.

And think about it, how many men do you know that have built a large amount of muscle quickly? Not too many, right? If men, who have significantly more testosterone, which is the primary muscle building hormone, have this much trouble gaining muscle, then it’s going to be extremely difficult for women. According to which research you look at, I’ve heard that women tend to have between 5-20 times less testosterone – on average – than men. In other words, it will be 5-20 times harder for you to build muscle than for the average Joe. So, it just won’t happen overnight.

If you have any other questions or concerns on this topic, then please check out a more comprehensive resource I put together on this subject awhile back: Strength Training For Women: Why Women Don’t Bulk Up From Strength Training.

Back on topic…

So, in summary, all of the pros and cons of the Six Pack Shortcuts program will apply to both guys and gals equally. It can and will work for both genders. So, if you’ve liked some of Mike Chang’s work, then maybe Six Pack Shortcuts would be a great option for you. And if not, then no worries. There are plenty of other great options out there.

Find out more in the complete Six Pack Shortcuts Review.

3 Responses

  1. Hi,
    Im trying to lose belly fat and tone my belly by may 15th. Because I will be going on a beach trip and Im not overweight or fat but I really want to lose that extra belly fat to look spectacular. WHat should I do? Do you think the sixpack short cut would be effective for me? I put in the work and Im not on an extreme diet but I eat normal portions of food every 3 hours. If you have any tips please let me know.
    Thanks,
    Larissa

    • Hi Larissa,

      I’ll tell you what I’ve told others who have asked similar questions. It’s hard to make any definite recommendations. But if you think you’d enjoy the program and actually stick with it, and there weren’t any reasons mentioned in my Six Pack Shortcuts review that would discourage you, then I’d say it’s worth a shot, especially if your diet is already on track.

      Any more questions, just let me know – happy to help.

  2. I have recently (since Christmas ’16) changed my lifestyle to try and get back to my high school body. After a couple of years of eating whatever I wanted whenever I wanted (and however much I wanted) I ballooned to 105.7kg. I’ve spent the past 6 months trying to eat healthier foods of smaller amounts and have managed to come down to 91.5kg. I’m 24 and a mere 155cm tall (5 foot and a tad, lol) and am considered morbidly obese. I will never get to my recommended BMI based weight of 55kg without looking like a skeleton (I’m just too curvy for that), but I was happy and healthy when at my year 12 weight of 62kg. Long story short, I want to get back there and I’ve been walking about 2kms a day (at a pace of about 8-10mins/km) and trying to stay away from bad foods but I’m not seeing the weight fall off fast enough, and I have a tenancy to fluctuate massively (about 1-2kg difference between my morning weight and my evening weight on any given day). I’m sure my metabolism has been affected by past weight-related decision (putting on 30kg in a year, losing 15 in 8 weeks, ect) so I’m eager to know if this workout would help me to shed the weight I want (ne; NEED) to shed as well as improving my shitty metabolism.

    Kind Regards,
    Sarah

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